Events Archive

The Geochemistry of Enceladus: Plume, Ocean, and Deep Interior

Wed, Apr 6, 2016 at 3:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Christopher Glein (San Antonio)

The Cassini-Huygens mission has revolutionized our understanding of the Saturn system. In particular, it has shown that the diminutive moon Enceladus is one of the most geologically active and exciting bodies in the solar system. This activity is tied to the existence of a subsurface ocean of liquid water that may be habitable or even inhabited. However, to make progress on the question of …

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Reconciling Dwarf Galaxies with LCDM Cosmology

Tue, Apr 5, 2016 at 1:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Andrew Wetzel (Caltech/Carnegie)

Low-mass "dwarf" galaxies trace structure formation on the smallest cosmological scales and represent the most significant challenges to the cold dark matter (CDM) model. Because these faintest galaxies are (best) observed only within the Local Group of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31), it is critical to understand and model their formation within the environment of a MW-mass …

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Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection in High-Energy Astrophysics: Particle Acceleration and Radiation

Mon, Apr 4, 2016 at 12:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Dmitri Uzdensky (University of Colorado, Boulder)

Many of the most spectacular astrophysical phenomena, in systems like relativistic black-hole jets, gamma-ray bursts, and pulsar wind nebulae, involve intense and rapid flares of high-energy radiation, often exhibiting nonthermal spectra.  Magnetic reconnection — a basic plasma process of rapid magnetic-field rearrangement and associated violent release of magnetic energy — is …

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The High Redshift Universe Next Door

Thu, Mar 31, 2016 at 4:00 pm

1 LeConte Hall

Josh Simon (Carnegie)

The dwarf galaxies around the Milky Way are extremely valuable laboratories for studying the nature of dark matter, the threshold for galaxy formation, and chemical evolution in the early universe.  After reviewing the revolution in our understanding of the Milky Way’s satellite population that has resulted from recent wide-field surveys, I will discuss how these objects provide …

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Department Lunch Talk 3-31

Thu, Mar 31, 2016 at 12:30 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Casey Law (UC Berkeley)
Mike Wong (UC Berkeley)
Josh Simon (Carnegie)

The Department Lunch Talk series is a weekly event that features three 20 minute talks presented mainly by local scientists of any level to present their work to a broad spectrum of the department and usually includes one short talk by the astronomy colloquium speaker of the day.  Subjects can include personal scientific research, reporting on other work appearing in journals, education and public outreach efforts, science policy, and professional development issues.

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CIPS Seminar: Enceladus Series 3-30

Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 3:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Jeffrey Fung (UC Berkeley)
Thomas Esposito (UC Berkeley)

This weeks CIPS Seminar will feature two speakers (please continuing reading for complete abstracts and titles).

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Constraints on halo energetics from combined Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements

Mon, Mar 28, 2016 at 12:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Nicholas Battaglia (Princeton)

Both feedback and non-thermal processes play important roles in the thermodynamic and star-formation properties of the intracluster medium (ICM). Recently, there have been exciting detections of the kinetic Sunyaez-Zel'dovich (SZ) from galaxy clusters. These measurements and future ones provide a new window into the thermodynamic properties of the ICM. I will show how we …

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The Architecture of Exoplanetary Systems

Thu, Mar 17, 2016 at 4:00 pm

1 LeConte Hall

Joshua Winn (MIT)

The basic geometry of the Solar System - the shapes, spacings, andorientations of the planetary orbits - has long been a subject offascination as well as inspiration for planet-formation theories. For exoplanetary systems, those same properties have only recently come into focus. I will review our current knowledge of the occurrence of planets around other stars, their orbital …

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Department Lunch Talk 3-17

Thu, Mar 17, 2016 at 12:30 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Eliot Quataert (UC Berkeley)
Eve Lee (UC Berkeley)
Chung-Pei Ma (UC Berkeley)

The Department Lunch Talk series is a weekly event that features three 20 minute talks presented mainly by local scientists of any level to present their work to a broad spectrum of the department and usually includes one short talk by the astronomy colloquium speaker of the day.  Subjects can include personal scientific research, reporting on other work appearing in journals, education and public outreach efforts, science policy, and professional development issues.

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Ultramafic-Hosted Submarine Hot-springs on Earth: Implications for Hydrothermal Processes on Enceladus

Wed, Mar 16, 2016 at 3:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Jeff Seewald (WHOI)

The coexistence of liquid water, rocks, and heat on Enceladus creates the potential for hydrothermal activity and a broad spectrum of geochemical processes that occur during the interaction of aqueous fluids with rock. Submarine hot-springs are a pervasive phenomenon on Earth and can inform our understanding of key factors required for the occurrence of hydrothermal activity on Enceladus and …

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The Missing Pages of Cosmic History

Tue, Mar 15, 2016 at 1:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Anastasia Fialkov (Harvard)

The first 400 Myr of cosmic history are extremely challenging to model and observe, but at the same time are also deeply important to understand since some of the crucial events in cosmic history, such as the formation of the very first stars, took place in that time window. Perhaps the most promising way to fill in the missing pages of cosmic history is by detecting the 21-cm signal of …

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LIGO discovery of a Binary Black Hole Merger

Mon, Mar 14, 2016 at 12:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Vicky Kalogera (Northwestern)

I will review the analysis of the first Advanced LIGO observations that launched the era of gravitational-wave astrophysics with the discovery of the GW150914 merger: data search, signal characterization, measurements of source properties. I will discuss how this observation enables the first tests of general relativity in the strong-field regime and what this discovery implies for black-hole …

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An Unseen Planet in the Solar System

Thu, Mar 10, 2016 at 4:00 pm

1 LeConte Hall

Konstantin Batygin (Caltech)

Beyond the orbit of Neptune, lies an expansive field of icy debris, known as the Kuiper belt. For the most part, the collective orbital structure of the Kuiper belt can be understood within the framework the present-day solar system. However, recent analyses have shown that distant orbits that belong to the scattered disk population of the Kuiper belt exhibit an unexpected alignment in …

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Department Lunch Talk 3-10

Thu, Mar 10, 2016 at 12:30 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Jason Wang (UC Berkeley)
Anna Franckowiak (DESY)
Konstantin Batygin (Caltech)

The Department Lunch Talk series is a weekly event that features three 20 minute talks presented mainly by local scientists of any level to present their work to a broad spectrum of the department and usually includes one short talk by the astronomy colloquium speaker of the day.  Subjects can include personal scientific research, reporting on other work appearing in journals, education and public outreach efforts, science policy, and professional development issues.

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Thermally triggered viscous flow and formation of the tiger-stripe fractures in the South Polar Terrain of Saturn’s moon Enceladus

Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 3:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

An Yin (UCLA)

The tiger-stripe fractures in the South Polar Terrain of Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus emit vapor jets contributing to the formation of Saturn’s E ring. Despite their spectacular display of active geologic processes, the origin of the fractures and their hosting South Polar Terrain remains poorly understood. In this talk I will show, via systematic analysis of high-resolution …

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