Events Archive

Recent results on the properties of z~1-2 star forming galaxy population

Tue, Jan 26, 2016 at 1:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Reinhard Genzel (UC Berkeley)

I will discuss recent results of the KMOS-3D and PHIBSS surveys relating to the properties of the massive star forming population at the peak of cosmic star formation activity. Topics will be the angular momentum distribution, rotation curves, baryon fraction, gas content and outflows.

More about Recent results on the properties of z~1-2 star forming galaxy population

Holiday Tales of Planet Formation: Feast, Famine, or…?

Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 4:00 pm

1 LeConte Hall

Joan Najita (NOAO)

The large number and diversity of planetary systems discovered to date present new challenges for planet formation theory. Core accretion remains the dominant paradigm of planet formation, despite these challenges. Yet what evidence do we have that core accretion actually occurs? I will discuss observations of nearby protoplanetary disks that may address this question. I will also illustrate …

More about Holiday Tales of Planet Formation: Feast, Famine, or…?

Department Lunch Talk 1-21

Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 12:30 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Imke de Pater (UC Berkeley)
Joan Najita (NOAO)
Manuel Rabold (Zurich)

The Department Lunch Talk series is a weekly event that features three 20 minute talks presented mainly by local scientists of any level to present their work to a broad spectrum of the department and usually includes one short talk by the astronomy colloquium speaker of the day.  Subjects can include personal scientific research, reporting on other work appearing in journals, education and public outreach efforts, science policy, and professional development issues.

More about Department Lunch Talk 1-21

A Decade and More of Enceladus: Observance of a Habitable World

Wed, Jan 20, 2016 at 3:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Carolyn Porco (CICLOPS)

For the past 11 years, the full-suite of scientific investigations onboard the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn has been brought to bear in the examination of the small icy moon, Enceladus. The information collected from these instruments --  high resolution imagers; ultraviolet, visible, near- and far-infrared spectrometers; in-situ mass spectrometers; small particle analyzers; Doppler radio …

More about A Decade and More of Enceladus: Observance of a Habitable World

From Puff-Ball Neptunes to Earth-sized Rocky planets: Exoplanets in the Kepler Era

Sat, Jan 16, 2016 at 11:00 am

159 Mulford Hall

Howard Isaacson (UC Berkeley)

Since the discovery of the first exoplanet around a Sun-like star in 1995, ground-based surveys and space-based telescopes have discovered thousands of planets outside of our Solar System. The properties of exoplanets range far beyond what we see in the Solar System. From Jupiter-sized planets nearly touching their stars, to gaseous mini-Neptunes, the variety of discoveries continues to …

More about From Puff-Ball Neptunes to Earth-sized Rocky planets: Exoplanets in the Kepler Era

Tracing the origins of the relations between super-massive black holes and their host galaxies

Tue, Dec 15, 2015 at 1:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Benny Trakhtenbrot (Zurich)

In the local Universe, super-massive black holes (SMBHs) are observed to be closely linked to their host galaxies. In this talk I will address the co-evolution of SMBHs and their hosts, from the local Universe, out to z~4. Several observational studies suggest that SMBH growth generally precedes that of the stellar population in the host. Among these, I will present new results from a Keck …

More about Tracing the origins of the relations between super-massive black holes and their host galaxies

Examining the Role of Environment in AGN Jet Production

Mon, Dec 14, 2015 at 12:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Ashley King (Stanford)

Precise determination of fuelling and triggering mechanisms of AGN and their outflows is vital to understanding the feedback processes from supermassive black holes. By examining the frequency of AGN and their outflows in and outside of clusters, one can determine the effects of merging, gas stripping, and other dynamical effects. X-ray studies of this nature have shown that AGN are affected …

More about Examining the Role of Environment in AGN Jet Production

Brown Dwarfs and Planets with Kepler and K2

Wed, Dec 9, 2015 at 3:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Ben Montet (Caltech)

While we know of thousands of brown dwarfs, only a handful have measured masses and radii. These  are typically younger or hotter than the field brown dwarf population, complicating efforts to understand the physical properties of field brown dwarfs for which atmospheric characterization is relatively simple. I will present an analysis …

More about Brown Dwarfs and Planets with Kepler and K2

The Upgraded GMRT : Current Status and Future Prospects

Tue, Dec 8, 2015 at 12:00 pm

121 Campbell Hall

Yashwant Gupta (National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Pune, India)

The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) is today a major international Radio Astronomy facility working in five discrete bands in the frequency range of 150 MHz to 1500 MHz, with a maximum instantaneous bandwidth of 32 MHz. Consisting of 30 fully steerable antennas of 45 metre diameter each, it can be used as an aperture-synthesis array for imaging, as well as a phased …

More about The Upgraded GMRT : Current Status and Future Prospects

Molecular Gas, Chemical Enrichment, and Feedback on the Molecular ISM of Dusty Galaxies in the Early Universe

Mon, Dec 7, 2015 at 3:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Justin Spilker (Arizona)

Out to at least z~4, the abundance of galaxies with stellar masses above log(M*/Msun)~11 suffers an exponential drop. These galaxies host little ongoing star formation, and appear to have been quickly and efficiently "quenched," but the process(es) by which quenching occurs are poorly understood. Recent observations and circumstantial evidence suggest that the bulk of star formation …

More about Molecular Gas, Chemical Enrichment, and Feedback on the Molecular ISM of Dusty Galaxies in the Early Universe

Dynamo Activity in Strongly Magnetized Accretion Disks

Mon, Dec 7, 2015 at 12:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Greg Salvesen (JILA)

Strongly magnetized accretion disks around black holes have attractive features that may explain enigmatic aspects of X-ray binary behavior.  The structure and evolution of these disks are governed by a dynamo-like mechanism, which channels part of the accretion power liberated by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) into an ordered toroidal magnetic field.  To study dynamo …

More about Dynamo Activity in Strongly Magnetized Accretion Disks

Department Lunch Talk 12-3

Thu, Dec 3, 2015 at 12:30 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Ann-Marie Madigan (UCB)
Casey Law (UCB)
Tanmoy Laskar (UCB)

The Department Lunch Talk series is a weekly event that features three 20 minute talks presented mainly by local scientists of any level to present their work to a broad spectrum of the department and usually includes one short talk by the astronomy colloquium speaker of the day. Subjects can include personal scientific research, reporting on other work appearing in journals, education and public outreach efforts, science policy, and professional development issues.

More about Department Lunch Talk 12-3

CIPS Seminar 12/2

Wed, Dec 2, 2015 at 3:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Paul Duffell (UC Berkeley)
David Romps (UC Berkeley)

This weeks CIPS Seminar will feature two speakers (please continuing reading for complete abstracts and titles).

More about CIPS Seminar 12/2

Constrain Galaxy Formation Physics from Large-Scale Structure Measurements and Weak Lensing

Tue, Dec 1, 2015 at 1:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Ying Zu, CMU

Galaxy formation is one of the most intractable phenomena in astrophysics due to the enormous complexity and diversity in the assembly histories of individual galaxies. Modern galaxy surveys provide a unique avenue to understanding galaxy formation physics in a statistical context, through various large-scale structure measurements and the weak gravitational lensing of large numbers of …

More about Constrain Galaxy Formation Physics from Large-Scale Structure Measurements and Weak Lensing

A Cluster of Receding Halo Stars Towards Norma

Mon, Nov 30, 2015 at 3:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Sukanya Chakrabarti (Rochester Institute of Technology)

We present results from follow-up spectroscopic observations of clustered Cepheid candidates identified from K-band light curves towards the Norma constellation (Chakrabarti et al. 2015), as well as others that we have found more recently. The average radial velocity of these stars is ~ 200 km/s, which is large and distinct from that of the Galaxy’s stellar disk. These objects at l ~ …

More about A Cluster of Receding Halo Stars Towards Norma