ASTRONOMY 202:  ASTROPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS

Spring 2008



Quicklinks

Problem sets

   




Basic fluid mechanics for astronomers, geared towards graduate students. The class aims to develop physical intuition and order-of-magnitude problem-solving skills.

TOPICS

       A. Mass, Momentum, and Energy Equations

       B. Drag

       C. Turbulence

       D. Inviscid Flow and the Bernoulli Constant

       E. Parker Wind / Bondi-Hoyle Accretion

       F. Acoustic Waves, Shocks, and Sedov-Taylor

       G. Convection / Mixing Length Theory

       H. Kelvin-Helmholtz Turbulence

       I. Thermal Instability

       J. Jeans Instability

       K. Viscous Accretion Disks

       L. Rayleigh Instability

       M. Spiral Density Waves and Toomre Q

       N. Magnetohydrodynamics

       O. Magneto-Rotational Instability

       P. Swing Amplification


Instructor
Eugene Chiang (Departments of Astronomy and of Earth and Planetary Science )

Campbell 511 / 2-2131 / echiang{at}astro.berkeley.edu

Time & Place
Mondays and Wednesdays 2:30 - 4:00 pm in 501 Campbell Hall

Office Hours
Anytime I am not talking to anybody else. For guaranteed meeting times, call or e-mail me.

Texts
Course Reader compiled by Chiang. On sale at Desktop Design in Shattuck Square.

Astrophysical Flows by Pringle and King

Physics of Astrophysics: Gas Dynamics by Shu

Physical Fluid Dynamics by Tritton (concise and readable, what I grew up with)

Elementary Fluid Dynamics by Acheson (concise and readable)

An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics by Batchelor (standard reference liked by many)

Fluid Mechanics by White (friendly, for engineers)

Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics by Munson, Young, and Okiishi (very friendly, for engineers)

Fluid Mechanics by Landau and Lifshitz (to read after reading the above)

Plasma Physics by Sturrock (selections are in the course reader)

Applications of Classical Physics by Blandford and Thorne (unpublished; to read after reading the above).


Movies

Format and Grading
Weekly lectures
Problem sets (80%)
Final exam (20%)



Problem Sets (80%)

If you use these problem sets for your classes, I would appreciate your letting me know by email, and giving credit to this class and to this website. Generally it takes considerable effort to construct problem sets.

Homework policy: Do it yourself. You may consult others and the instructor, but only after having thought seriously about the problem yourself. Furthermore, your final solution should be written up by yourself, in isolation, without any notes from anyone else. You may ask for short extensions in special circumstances.

Solution set policy: Responsibility for new solutions in .tex will be handed to the TA and perhaps spread uniformly across the class.

        PS 1: Due Wed Jan 30 Postscript version here. PDF version here
        PS 2: Due Wed Feb 6 Postscript version here. PDF version here
        PS 3: Due Wed Feb 13 Postscript version here. PDF version here
        PS 4: Due Wed Feb 20 Postscript version here. PDF version here
        PS 5: Due Wed Feb 27 Postscript version here. PDF version here
        PS 6: Due Wed Mar 5 Postscript version here. PDF version here
        PS 7: Due Wed Mar 12 Postscript version here. PDF version here
        PS 8: Due Wed Mar 19 Postscript version here. PDF version here
        PS 9: Due Wed Apr 2 Postscript version here. PDF version here
        PS 10: Due Wed Apr 9 Postscript version here. PDF version here
        PS 11: Due Wed Apr 16 Postscript version here. PDF version here
        PS 12: Due Wed Apr 23 Postscript version here. PDF version here
       

Final Exam (20%)

You may opt for either oral or written formats. Many students who would like to practice for their oral qualifying exams (and for giving scientific talks) choose the oral option.