Erik Petigura | Erik Petigura http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse Finding new worlds Sat, 26 Oct 2013 00:00:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5 Holiday Play http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/16/holiday-play/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=holiday-play http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/16/holiday-play/#comments Wed, 16 Jan 2013 03:16:28 +0000 admin http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/?p=312 The  2010 holiday play

The 2010 holiday play

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Birthday http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/16/birthday/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=birthday http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/16/birthday/#comments Wed, 16 Jan 2013 03:15:25 +0000 admin http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/?p=310 A very special dinner with my fellow first years

A very special dinner with my fellow first years

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Hyperwall http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/16/hyperwall/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=hyperwall http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/16/hyperwall/#comments Wed, 16 Jan 2013 03:14:04 +0000 admin http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/?p=308 At the hyperwall

At the hyperwall

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Jammin http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/16/304/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=304 http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/16/304/#comments Wed, 16 Jan 2013 03:09:49 +0000 admin http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/?p=304 Jammin

Jammin

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Mauna Kea http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/16/mauna-kea/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mauna-kea http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/16/mauna-kea/#comments Wed, 16 Jan 2013 00:17:14 +0000 admin http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/?p=267 Hale Pohaku

Hale Pohaku

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Hyperwall http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/15/256/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=256 http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/15/256/#comments Tue, 15 Jan 2013 23:53:43 +0000 admin http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/?p=256 At the hyperwall

At the hyperwall

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The Frequency of Small Planets http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/08/124/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=124 http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/08/124/#comments Tue, 08 Jan 2013 20:59:40 +0000 admin http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/?p=124 The fraction of Sun-like stars having planets of different sizes, orbiting within 1/4 of the Earth-Sun distance (0.25 AU) of the host star.  The graph shows that planets as small as Earth (far left) are relatively common compared to planets 8.0x the size of Earth (similar to Jupiter).   For example, 7.9% of Sun-like stars harbor a planet with a size of 1.0 - 1.4 times the size of Earth, orbiting inward of 1/4 the Earth-Sun distance (closer than Mercury's distance from the Sun).  There are increasing numbers of planets from 8x the size of Earth down to 2.8x Earth.  Remarkably, the number of planets smaller than 2.8x Earth is approximately constant with planet size, down to the size of our Earth.  The gray indicates the planets discovered in this study, and the orange represents the correction applied to account for planets our software would miss statistically, typically about 20%.

The fraction of Sun-like stars having planets of different sizes, orbiting within 1/4 of the Earth-Sun distance (0.25 AU) of the host star. The graph shows that planets as small as Earth (far left) are relatively common compared to planets 8.0x the size of Earth (similar to Jupiter). For example, 7.8% of Sun-like stars harbor a planet with a size of 1.0 – 1.4 times the size of Earth, orbiting inward of 1/4 the Earth-Sun distance (closer than Mercury’s distance from the Sun). There are increasing numbers of planets from 8x the size of Earth down to 2.8x Earth. Remarkably, the number of planets smaller than 2.8x Earth is approximately constant with planet size, down to the size of our Earth. The gray indicates the planets discovered in this study, and the orange represents the correction applied to account for planets our software would miss statistically, typically about 20%.

As of January 2013, the official Kepler pipeline has detected over 2700 planet candidates. Understanding the distribution of planet sizes, however, remains difficult due to unknown pipeline completeness (i.e. the number of missed planets). Using my own transit search pipeline called “TERRA,” I searched for planets in the quietest 12,000 solar-type stars in the Kepler sample. I detected 129 planet candidates, 37 of which were previously unpublished. Finally, I characterized the number of missed planets through a suite of injection and recovery experiments and produced the de-biased distribution of planet sizes. Remarkably, one in six sunlike stars, hosts a 1-2 Earth-radius planet within 0.25 AU. Also, the rapid rise in planet occurrence toward smaller planet size shown in Howard et al. (2012) stops at ~2.0 Earth-radii, suggesting some aspect of planet formation physics turns off at roughly twice the size of Earth.

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Are Earths Rare? http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/08/are-earths-rare/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=are-earths-rare http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2013/01/08/are-earths-rare/#comments Tue, 08 Jan 2013 01:21:22 +0000 admin http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/?p=280 AAS Long Beach, January 2013 – Download Presentation (PDF)

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TERRA – Optimized for Small Planets http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2012/09/15/terra-optimized-for-small-planets/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=terra-optimized-for-small-planets http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2012/09/15/terra-optimized-for-small-planets/#comments Sat, 15 Sep 2012 21:42:05 +0000 admin http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/?p=147 Removing systematic errors from Kepler photometry with TERRA. Top: sixty days of raw photometry from Kepler. Bottom: calibrated photometry after removing systematic errors found in a large ensemble of stars. Brightness variations measured in parts per thousand.

Removing systematic errors from Kepler photometry with TERRA. Top: sixty days of raw photometry from Kepler. Bottom: calibrated photometry after removing systematic errors found in a large ensemble of stars. Brightness variations measured in parts per thousand.

Our interest in Earth-size planets has lead Geoff Marcy and me to develop our own transit search pipeline called “TERRA.” When we designed TERRA, we looked at every aspect of a transit search pipeline and asked, “how can we optimize this for small planets?” For example, TERRA identifies systematic noise modes in the time domain shared by a large number of stars, and removes them from each light curve photometry.

Paper in PASP

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Identification and Removal of Modes in Kepler Photometry http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2012/06/12/identification-and-removal-of-modes-in-kepler-photometry/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=identification-and-removal-of-modes-in-kepler-photometry http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/2012/06/12/identification-and-removal-of-modes-in-kepler-photometry/#comments Tue, 12 Jun 2012 01:15:35 +0000 admin http://localhost:8888/dizzyhouse/?p=276 AAS Anchorage, June 2012 – Download Poster (PDF)

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