Department Events


Fast and Furious: Young Supernovae and Their Progenitors

Mon, Aug 31, 2015 at 12:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Yi Cao (Caltech)

Observations of supernovae within a few days of explosion provide unique constraints to the nature of their progenitors. Since 2013, as a part of my thesis, I used the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) to systematically study extraordinarily young supernovae. I will first provide an overview of iPTF survey design, summarize the fast turnaround …

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Unveiling the Link Between Supermassive Black Holes and Galaxies

Tue, Sep 1, 2015 at 1:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Ai-Lei Sun (Princeton)

Feedback from Active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been proposed as an important quenching mechanism to suppress star formation in massive galaxies. We investigate the most direct form of AGN feedback - galactic outflows, in the most luminous AGN in the nearby universe. Using ALMA and Magellan observations to target molecular and ionized outflows, we find that luminous AGN can impact the dynamics …

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Friends of Hot Jupiters: Exploring the Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems

Wed, Sep 2, 2015 at 3:00 pm

131 Campbell Hall

Heather Knutson (Caltech)

Since the discovery of the first extrasolar planet around a sun-like star nearly two decades ago, exoplanets have revolutionized our understanding of planet formation and migration. Although it was suspected at the time that the giant planets in our own solar system might have undergone some orbital evolution, the discovery of a class of short-period gas giant planets known as …

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Department Lunch Talk 9-3

Thu, Sep 3, 2015

131A Campbell Hall

James Graham (UCB)
Carl Heiles (UCB)
Heather Knutson (Caltech)

James Graham, UCB - "Recent Results from The Gemini Planet Imager" Carl Heiles, UCB - TBA Heather Knutson, CalTech [colloq. spkr.] - "Spitzer Observations of the Massive, Eccentric Transiting Planet HAT-P-2b”

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Atmospheres of Extrasolar Planets in the Super-Earth Era

Thu, Sep 3, 2015 at 4:00 pm

2 LeConte Hall

Heather Knutson (Caltech)

Ongoing surveys of nearby stars have revealed an amazing diversity of planetary systems, many of which have characteristics that differ substantially from those of the solar system planets. Perhaps one of the biggest surprises to come out of these surveys was the discovery that "super-Earths" (planets between 1-10 times the mass of the Earth) are in fact the most common type of …

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Kepler 138b - A Mars-size planet in a Tug-of-War

Wed, Aug 26, 2015 at 3:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Jason Rowe (NASA Ames)

Thousands of extrasolar planets have been found with with a wide range of masses and radii yet only small fraction of these planets have had both their mass and radius measured. aving both the mass and radius gives insight towards the bulk composition of a planet. Dr. Rowe will present an analysis of the 3-planet transiting Kepler-138 system where his group was able to measure the mass …

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O-star formation triggered by cloud-cloud collision; From super star clusters to Spitzer bubbles

Mon, Jul 6, 2015 at 12:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Yasuo Fukui (Nagoya University)

We find the following sentence in Zinnecker and York “Toward Understanding Massive Star Formation” in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics 45, (2007), “Rapid external shock compression (i.e., supersonic gas motions) generating high column densities in less than a local free-fall time rather than slow quasi-static build-up of massive cores may be the receipt to set …

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Quasistatic Equlibrium Models of Galaxy Formation and the Consequences of Stochasticity: The Central Limit Theorem, Memory, and Precision Galaxy Evolution from First Principles

Tue, May 12, 2015 at 1:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Dan Kelson (Carnegie)

Incomplete knowledge of fundamental aspects of astrophysics severely limits the realism and accuracy of star-formation histories in simulations, resulting in poorly modeled correlations of galaxy properties with mass and environment, hampering our understanding of how galaxy populations have evolved for the past 13 Gyr. We have now derived new insights from the observed correlation of …

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Black Holes in Low Mass Galaxies

Mon, May 11, 2015 at 12:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Anil Seth (University of Utah)

Supermassive black holes are ubiquitous in massive galaxies, but it remains unclear how many sub-Milky Way mass galaxies host black holes.  The demographics of black holes in lower mass galaxies provide the only currently observable test of how supermassive black hole form in the early universe.  I will discuss my work to find and measure the mass of black holes in lower mass …

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Longitude-resolved VLA Radio Maps of Jupiter

Wed, May 6, 2015 at 3:00 pm

131A Campbell Hall

Imke de Pater (UC Berkeley)

Visible light and 5-micron infrared images of Jupiter reveal the familiar zone-belt structure, where the brown belts appear as warm regions at 5 μm. As clouds are a major source of opacity at this wavelength, the high 5 μm temperatures are indicative of no or relatively thin cloud decks so that deeper warmer layers are probed. In the mid-eighties microwave images at 1 – 6 …

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